British Columbia

Trapline South of Dawson Creek

#960
$50,000
New Listing
Size: 

100 square miles approximately

Location: 

Just south of Dawson Creek and to the east

Game Species: 
wolverine, fox, beaver, marten, lynx, mink, muskrat, river otter, squirrel, weasel, wolf
WMU: 
7-20
Description: 

Here's an opportunity for you fellows in Fort St. John /Dawson Creek area.  This trapline has sections of farm land and bush country.  Easily accessible and waiting to be trapped.  Ready for your application to build a cabin.

Improvements Summary: 
none
Equipment: 

none

55.721418°, -120.281067°
Photos: 

Riverfront Acreage in the Pine Pass

#959
$136,000
New Listing
Size: 

13.5 Riverfront Deeded Acres

Location: 

60 kms west of Chetwynd

Description: 

Fantastic recreational acreage on the Pine River.  This 13.5 acre property is located 60 kms west of Chetwynd making it easily accessible, yet having world-class rec opportunities right in your backyard.  Fish from your front yard in the morning and quad from your backyard in the afternoon.  Oh and did I mention the Pine Pass gets a bit of snow?  Don't forget your snowmobile in the winter months!  

The acreage has been partially hayed in past years, but is still treed and has a park-like feel to it.  Come and build your dream home or use as your own personal recreational playground.  

Improvements Summary: 
None - land only.
Other Information: 

Please call Lynzy at 250-870-3021 for more information or email her at lynzy@mccowans.com.

55.635542°, -122.228394°
Photos: 

Recreational Opportunity South of Chetwynd

#958
$100,000
New Listing
Size: 

70 acres on License of Occupation

Location: 

South of Chetwynd

Fish Species: 
Bull Trout, Rainbow Trout, Arctic Grayling, Whitefish.
Description: 

This is a great opportunity for someone that wants to take a few clients every year to get away from it all.  This License of Occupation (LOC) includes 4 separate sites south of Chetwynd: Bullmoose Creek, Sukunka River and two sites on the Murray River. This is a commercial recreation license allowing for a wide range of activities.  Two of the sites include well-kept log cabins.

Main camp is accessible by road and includes 68 acres with 15 to 20 of those acres being good horse pasture with a creek running through it.  This site used to include a hip-roof barn and corrals, however, they are in disrepair now.  The Sukunka River site is also accessible via road (wall tent site), whereas the other two sites (cabin sites) are only accessible via four wheeler or horse.

On the license you also have access to a large area around Bullmoose Creek, Sukunka River and Murray River for your recreational use.  Because this LOC is on a commercial recreation license and does not specify a particular activity, the possibilities are abundant for what you could do.  The past owner used the LOC for hiking trips, horse pack trips, and float trips.  Bring your ideas and make it your own!

Improvements Summary: 
2 log cabins
Improvements: 

- 2 log cabins

Other Information: 

Please call Lynzy for more information 250-870-3021 or email lynzy@mccowans.com.

55.378696°, -121.707916°
Photos: 

Lakefront Get-Away or Fishing Lodge south of Houston

#957
$225,000
New Listing
Size: 

9.3 acres on Crown Lease

Location: 

40 kms. south of Houston

Fish Species: 
Rainbow trout, lake trout, and char. Cutthroat trout, salmon and steelhead nearby.
Description: 

This is a great lakefront get-away only 45 minutes south of Houston on a good gravel road.  This 9.3 acre property is situated on quiet Owen Lake with 7,000 foot Nadina Mountain practically in your backyard.  The fishing is fabulous for trout and char in Owen Lake, as well as cutthroat trout being available at nearby glacial fed Klate and Base Lakes.  Fantastic salmon and steelhead fishing is only a 20 minute drive away on the Morice River.  After your morning fish, hike up Nadina Mountain from the old trail that starts right from the property.     

This Crown Lease property consists of 2 log cabins overlooking the lake.  The cabins each have 2 sets of bunk beds, kitchen with propane stove and fridge, and wood stoves for heat.  The cabins come complete with pots, pans, dishes, and furnishings. Also, on the property is a large 46 x 44 hanger / shop with concrete floor, completely dry-walled.  Included in the sale are two generators housed in the powerhouse, along with a 500 gallon fuel tank.  There is a water license on Klate Creek which flows through the property.      

There is also an old log lodge on the property that may be repairable for someone that is handy and ambitious!

Bring this property back to it’s original glory as a lodge or use as is for a fishing or hunting get-away or just somewhere to go with the family. 

Area Data: 

Nadina Mountain Provincial Park

Nadina Mountain Park encompasses an isolated granitic mountain rising up from the rolling terrain of the Nechako Plateau. The mountain is a unique and dominant feature on the landscape and is theorized to have been a refugia during the last glaciation. Unique rock formations include large granite pillars. Heavy forest below gives way to an expansive alpine tundra on the summit plateau.

A significant population of mountain goats make Nadina Mountain their home. Tufts of goat hair are to be found on rocks along the route to the summit and viewing opportunities are plentiful. Other species commonly observed in the area are black bear, ground squirrels, marmots and deer.

Improvements Summary: 
2 Log Cabins, Hanger/Shop, Powerhouse, Log Lodge (in disrepair)
Improvements: 

Two Log Cabins:

-wood stove

-fridge

-stove

-pots, pans, dishes

-2 bunk beds

-4 mattresses

-dinette set

-deck

-wired for power 

Hanger/Shop

-44 x 46 

-fully dry-walled

-concrete floor

-tin roof

-large roll-up door

Powerhouse

-16 x 12

Log Lodge (in disrepair)

-3,780 sq. ft.

-did have 5 bedrooms, kitchen, dining room, and 2 bathrooms

Equipment: 

-37.5 KW generator

-4.5 KW generator

-500 gallon fuel tank

-dock

Other Information: 

Please call Lynzy at 250-870-3021 for more information or email at lynzy@mccowans.com.

54.099644°, -126.753988°
Maps: 
Photos: 

SW of 100 Mile House

#952
$385,000
Size: 

1575 square kilometers / 600 square miles approximately

Location: 

SW of 100 Mile House, NW of Clinton

Game Species: 
California Bighorn Sheep, Moose, Mule Deer, Whitetail Deer, Black Bear, Cougar, Lynx, Bobcat, Wolf
WMU: 
5-02, 3-31
Quotas: 
2017 - 2021 5 year quota: 1 sheep, 31 moose, remainder open including full curl sheep
Description: 

Here we go, only once in a long while do we have the opportunity to sell a territory easily accessed with motor vehicle and also having a sheep quota.  That's right this territory has one 3/4 curl California Bighorn in 5 years.  Not only that, but there is an opportunity to take more sheep under the full curl regulations.  There's also a good moose quota, some gangly old mulies that will make your heart stop.  Well, you know what happens when you have deer kicking around; yes, this is also one of the better cat areas in the Cariboo.  There's enough going on this territory to keep an enterprising outfitter busy throughout the year.  Start in the spring with black bear and end in winter with cats.  No equipment or camps associated with this sale, however there is ample opportunity to pick up a new licences and have yourself a cabin looking over the Fraser River.  How about a gold claim on the Fraser, spend your winters eating sour dough and panning for gold in the winter?  Don't forget great wild rainbow fishing on a dry fly!

Area Data: 

Geographically, the South Cariboo is found in southcentral British Columbia, nestled on the Fraser Plateau between the heights of the Coastal and Rocky mountain ranges. The Fraser River cuts through the middle of this rolling plateau, dividing the Cariboo from the wilds of the Chilcotin. To the south is the lower, drier hills of the Thompson-Okanagan, and to the north is the central Cariboo, extending into the vast forests of Northern BC.

The town of 100 Mile House is the main service centre for the South Cariboo region. However, many small communities and neighbourhoods dot the region with their own special character and meeting places. Just a few kilometers north of 100 Mile House are the bedroom communities of 103 Mile, 105 Mile, and the well-known 108 Mile Ranch. The community names originate from the stopping houses on the old Goldrush Trail, or Cariboo Waggon Road, as it was called in the late 1800s.

Continuing north along Hwy 97, takes you through the rolling grassy landscape to the town of Lac La Hache, the longest town in the Cariboo. The meadows and ranchlands along the San Jose Creek, which drains Lac la Hache, will usher you north to the Central Cariboo region.

If you decide to head east into more mountainous terrain, you will encounter the slopes of the Mt. Timothy ski hill, and many good fishing lakes. Some of the largest lakes in the South Cariboo are located along the Canim-Hendrix Road which passes beside Canim Lake before turning into a maze of gravel backroads. Don’t forget Mahood Lake and its waterfalls, which provide western access to the famous Wells Gray Provincial Park. Farther south is the Fishing Highway (aka Hwy 24) which heads east through the Interlakes area, and finally over the McDonald Summit at 1311m before dropping down into the North Thompson region.

If you head south from 100 Mile House along Hwy 97, you will drive through the plateau to 70 Mile House, where roads head east to Green Lake. The South Cariboo’s most southern community on Hwy 97, is the historic town of Clinton.

The western forests and grasslands of the South Cariboo are sparsely settled but offer many unique landscapes to discover. The whole region is linked, like a huge spider web, by trails and backroads, some of which can be driven (See our Scenic Drives brochure) and some which can only be accessed by small machines or on foot or horseback (See our Trails & Adventures brochure). This web extends into neighbouring regions as well as between the local communities. Some are well-marked and maintained, and some only reside within the memories of the old-timers.

Improvements Summary: 
none
Equipment: 

none

Other Information: 

Call Harry 250-717-1100

51.440861°, -121.489563°
Maps: 
Photos: 

Hunting Territory located West of Quesnel

#951
$178,000
Price Change
Size: 

1500 sq. Km / 500 sq. miles approximately

Location: 

West of Williams Lake, NE of Anahim Lake, on the Blackwater, Cariboo/Chilcotin

Game Species: 
Moose, Mountain Caribou, Black Bear, Mule Deer, Wolf, Lynx
Fish Species: 
Rainbow and Bull Trout
WMU: 
5-12, 6-01
Quotas: 
2017-2021: 16 Moose, 3 Caribou,
Description: 

This territory is located in some of the most famous area of the Cariboo/Chilcotin starting with one of the most famous Rainbow Trout rivers in BC, the Blackwater (West Road) and moving on to some of the most famous cowboys settling in this country year past only to find it was game rich and gold in the grass.  The area takes in part of 6-1 and 5-12 splitting quotas for moose into each WMU.  The area stretches from the Naglico Hills in the north to the Itcha and Ilgachuz Ranges to the south.   Westerly boundaries include Eliguk Lake and almost reaching Tsacha Lake to the east.  The majority of the area is only accessible via floatplane and horse although there are a few 4x4 roads in the northern part. 

There is a main camp on Shag Creek that is accessible by horse trail.  Camp includes 5 good log cabins for sleeping plus a main cabin with shower room and regular amenities.  There is also a corral, tack and meat shed.  There is also an old airstip.  There are 2 cabin camps and 3 other outpost camps, some with older buildings and others are camping locations.  All cabins are log with tin roofs containing stoves and general equipment.

Hunting has historically been done using the main camp as a base and spreading out from there.  Clients can be delivered by floatplane to a lake close to the main camps and then trucked in.  Air services that have been used in the past are located out of Nimpo Lake.  There is now an opportunity in the northern part of the area to use 4x4 via Vanderhoof. 

Area Data: 

Itcha Ilgachuz Provincial Park comprises almost 112,000 hectares of unique landscape in the West Chilcotin Uplands. The landscape is diverse, and contains volcanic landforms, alpine environments, and forest sites scattered with wetlands.

The park was recommended for protection under the Cariboo-Chilcotin Land-Use Plan, and designated a Class “A” Park in 1995. Itcha Ilgachuz is a Wilderness Park set aside to protect alpine grasslands, wetlands, and wildlife habitat, including the largest herd of Mountain Caribou in southern B.C.

The Itcha Range and Ilgachuz Range are examples of isolated shield volcanoes, rising up to 2400 metres above sea level. These ranges are situated in the rain shadow of the Coast Mountains, and support a high diversity of plant and animal species.

Improvements Summary: 
Main log cabin camp and 5 licenced outpost
Improvements: 

Main Camp is all log structures:

  • Cook House
  • 4 Cabins for 2-4 guests
  • 1 Guide Cabin
  • 1 Meat House
Equipment: 
  • Fully equipped cook house
  • bunks, stoves, etc.
  • each camp has basic supplies
  • 1 aluminum boat
  • 1 canoe
52.774827°, -125.116768°
Photos: 

North Coast Hunting Territory

#949
$995,000
Size: 

2100 square miles appr.

Location: 

West Coast - south of Kitimat

Game Species: 
Mountain Goat, Grizzly, Black Bear, Blacktail Deer
Fish Species: 
5 species of salmon, steelhead, trout
WMU: 
6-03
Quotas: 
2017-2021 - 5 year quota: 4 Grizzly, 33 Goat and 22 Black Bear within Kitlope Conservancy, Goat and Black Bear open outside Kitlope
Description: 

This 2100 square mile territory is absolutely spectacular and really shows off the true meaning of coastal British Columbia. For those looking for adventure and wilderness activities you've come to the right place; from the shores of the Gardner Canal where large bruin chase salmon in their spawning beds and rustle through the blueberry patches, to alpine at 3500' - 5000', where trophy Billy Goats graze and die of old age.  This is truly a diversified territory from saltwater flats gorged with driftwood and berry patches to ancient ice, meters thick hanging between the peaks.  This territory is not a place for the meek of heart, there's no jumping in your 4 x 4, not in this territory, it'll take more than that to hunt.

There are many interior territories, however there are only a few coastal territories and of these there are only 3 on the north coast. These 3 territories are renowned for their trophy class grizzly and goat along with some huge black bear.  It affords me great pleasure to bring you the opportunity to purchase one of these territories.  The territory takes in the southern portion of the Gardner Canal, which includes the Kemano River, Kowesas River, Kitlope River and the Tezwa River. These rivers and estuaries are home to some of the largest bruin in the province. Mountain goats in this area are unsurpassed with high populations and exceptional goats readily available.  Trophy goats begin at 4 years old and score 48” to 50” B&C.

The record books clearly show where the trophy grizzlies and old billies come from.  For those reasons you will not be selling the average hunt nor asking the average fee.  Your expeditions and your hunts will be sought after and cherished dearly by those individuals who want more; more than the average and wish to challenge the real British Columbia.  Your clients will take home exceptional animals earned with stories that make the hair on the back of your neck stand up and lure new clients like a child to a forbidden candy store.

Access to this territory is very limited; only through the use of ocean boats, jet boats and/or float planes will the outfitter and clients be able to access different areas for hunting and other activities.  This is wilderness, real wilderness, there are no roads into this area, and with the Kitlope Heritage Conservancy (Park) this area defines wilderness.  Not much will change here in the next hundred years.

Many of the rivers within the territory are accessed using jet boat which also allows clients the opportunity to fish salmon or steelhead. For those of you wishing to fill in the time between spring bear and fall hunts there is ample opportunity for fishing and eco-tourism clients.  Many hunting clients express an interest in coming back with family members for summertime activities.

Kemano and the Kemano River are in the territory which is where Rio Tinto generate power for their aluminum smelter some 50 miles north.  The park is also fully within the territory.  Except for grizzly there are no quotas, except within the park.

This territory is the pearl of the coast!  High value animals, spectacular scenery, arm numbing angling.  These types of offerings seldom come to the market and are generally purchased and run by families for enduring times. 

Call Harry - 250-717-1100.

Area Data: 

The Gardner Canal is one of the principal inlets of the British Columbia coast.  Technically a side-inlet of the larger Douglas Channel, the Gardner Canal is still 90 km (56 mi) in length in its own right; total length of the waterways converging on the Douglas Channel is 320 km (200 mi) making it one of the largest fjord-complexes in the world. The entrance to the Gardner Canal is hidden behind Hawkesbury Island, and is accessed via Devastation Sound or Varney Passage which form the northeast and southeast flanks of that island.

The Kitlope Heritage Conservancy covers 322,020 hectares (795,700 acres) of coastal temperate rainforest, making it the largest such preserve in the world.  It lies at the head of the Whidbey Reach of the Gardner Canal, and encompasses the drainages of the Kitlope, Kalitan, Gamsby, Tsaytis, Kapella, and Tezwa rivers. During the spring melt, these rivers are subject to heavy flooding and carry large amounts of debris. Much of the park is mountainous; south of the Kitlope River the granite domes and ridges are part of the Kitlope Range, a sub-range of the Kitimat Ranges.  In the north, they form part of the Tochquonyalla Range, a sub-range of the Tahtsa Ranges.  Icefields and glaciers occupy the higher elevations.

The valley floors of the park are narrow, most being between one and two kilometres wide. Many, such as the Gamsby valley, are covered by braided channels of gravel deposited by the rivers. The park has one major lake, Kitlope, which is fed by the Tezwa River and enters the Kitlope River near its estuary.

The park is part of a large continuous area of protected wilderness.  TweedsmuirProvincial Park, which abuts Kitlope in the northeast, is the largest protected area in the province. The Fjordland Conservancy protects over 80,000 hectares of coastal fjords on the KHC's western boundary. Together the major parks and several smaller reserves represent over 2.3 million hectares of undeveloped land in a variety of ecological zones

Improvements Summary: 
2 tent frame camps
Improvements: 

Tent frame platforms

Equipment: 
  • 2001 Wilga 2000 Floatplane, 300hp 280hrs TT, fresh prop overhaul.
  • 2015 River Hawk 16' Jet Boat, twin Tohatsu Jets.
  • 2 x Northwest shelters tents with aluminum frames and covered porches
53.347797°, -127.922058°
Photos: 

Hunting Territory NE of Burns Lake

#948
$179,000
Sale Pending
Size: 

250 square miles appr.

Location: 

East end of Babine Lake and to the south

Game Species: 
Moose, Black Bear, Mule Deer, Cougar, Wolf
Fish Species: 
Rainbow Trout, Lake Trout, Burbot
WMU: 
6-6
Quotas: 
2017-2021 - 5 year quota: 15 moose
Description: 

Here's a great moose / black bear territory located NE of Burns Lake taking in the eastern end of Babine Lake and most of the Sutherland River drainage.  This area is quite remote although still accessible by 4x4 and quad.  Main camp with rough road access is located in an isolated portion of the territory on a moose meadow.  This is a great package for someone wanting to get into the outfitting business

Area Data: 

Sutherland River Provincial Park and Protected Area protect adjacent parcels of land along approximately 50 km of the Sutherland River and Babine Lake. It provides park visitors with a variety of river based recreation opportunities, and protects a river with important habitat for spawning fish and other wildlife.
Established Date: April 5, 2001 for the park; and July 6, 2000 for the protected area.
Park Size: 18,394 hectares (13,559 of Class A Park, 4,835 of Protected Area)

Wildlife: The Sutherland River is an important spawning river for sockeye, kokanee and steelhead in Babine Lake. The Park and Protected Area also provide important habitat for moose, grizzly bears and wolves.

Improvements Summary: 
4 Cabins, meat house, shower house, corrals, 2 out houses
Improvements: 
  • cook house,
  • guest cabins,
  • guide cabin,
  • new cabin being built with all logs are on sight 
  • Cabins have been restained and roofs repaired recently
Equipment: 

General camp equipment.

 

54.489003°, -125.176935°
Photos: 

Hunting Territory West of Fort St. John

#947
$1,925,000
Sold
Size: 

1500 square miles appr.

Location: 

Williston Lake area, West of Hudson's Hope

Game Species: 
Stone Sheep, Grizzly, Moose, Elk, Goat, Black Bear, Mule Deer, Whitetail Deer
WMU: 
7-36 & 7-37
Quotas: 
2017-2021 quota: Sheep - 6, Grizzly - 4
Description: 

This territory is located on the north side of Williston Lake, and in the heart of the game rich Rocky Mountains.  The area is unique in many aspects.  As in many northern areas it is accessible by float plane, has a good air strip at main camp and wheel strips at some outpost camps.  One of the differences between this area and others is it also has access to the main camp via boat through Williston Lake.  This alone allows the delivery of both supplies and clients in a practical and cost efficient method.  The second interesting part of this territory is that it has approximately 100 miles of roads with no outside access.  The present outfitter makes use of these roads with horses, 4 wheelers and 4x4’s.  Imagine having your own outfit with so much road that is virtually untraveled by the hunting public.  This really is a hunter’s paradise and allows access to excellent hunting for all hunters regardless of physical condition. 

The area takes in 2 MU units with some access to the outer edges by outside roads and trails not connected to interior road system.  Game species include Stone Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Grizzly, Black Bear, Whitetail and Mule Deer.  Hunting is usually organized through the main camp which is located at the mouth of Nabesche River.  This location is centrally located while still on Williston Lake.  A previous logging operation existed not far from this location and with it has left a very good gravel strip.  The camp is only a few minutes ride from the strip.  From main camp hunters are delivered either by wheel plane or vehicle to trail heads and outcamps.  Outcamps consist of approximately 2 cabin camps and 9 other spike camps.

This is one of the neatest operation I have seen in many years, combining the location of the main camp, the geography of the area, the ability to use motor vehicles where others don’t, all leads to a very efficient, easily operated, money making operation.  The reliance on aircraft is not needed but can be used if the new owner is prone to a flying operation.  The game species are varied and are excellent quality.  It’s seldom that we have such a variety of game with this type of access. 

The main camp is well developed and affords comfortable accommodations overlooking Williston Lake.  There's a main lodge with kitchen facilities, accommodation and lounging/dining area.  3 cabins make up the remainder of accommodation for clients.  There is also more than adequate accommodate for guides and wrangler.  On sight there are several auxiliary buildings making main camp the vocal point of most excursions.  The present outfitter also uses main camp as a year round getaway.  There is additional revenue generated through spring and summer from silviculture and mining interests in the area.

Wow, there is just so much here.  Put all this together and I feel this is one of the top-notch areas in Northern British Columbia and for those of you wishing a prosperous business with great possibilities of expansion or a semi-private hunting operation this is the one to look at. 

Area Data: 

Williston Lake (Reservoir), the largest freshwater body in British Columbia, was created in 1968 with the completion of the W. A. C. Bennet Dam. The dam blocked the flow of the Peace River and impounded the upper Peace and lower Parsnip and Finlay Rivers. Lake creation has resulted in three relatively discrete reaches: the Finlay and Parsnip Reaches lying in a north-south direction in the Rocky Mountain Trench and the Peace Reach passing through the Rocky Mountains in a west-east direction. Williston Lake waters pass through the W. A. C. Bennett Dam, Dinosaur Lake (reservoir) and the Peace Canyon Dam before entering the Peace River and ultimately the Mackenzie River system on their way to the Arctic Ocean.

Surficial geology shows Williston Lake bounded by a variety of landforms. Geological features include a series of terraces formed by glacial outwash, moraines and lacustrine deposits as well as alluvial fans and steep slopes of sedimentary rock. The major physiographic units include the Cassiar-Columbia Mountains bounding the western edge of Williston Lake, the Rocky Mountain trench of which the Finlay and Parsnip Reaches occupy and the eastern systems including the Rocky Mountains, through which the Peach Reach passes.

Historically, the river valleys were used by native tribes of nomadic hunters and gatherers. First European contact was made by Alexander MacKenzie who used the Peace River valley as his access point through the Rocky Mountains during his journey to the Pacific Ocean in 1793. Simon Fraser further opened the region establishing a series of fur trading posts in 1805. Following the decline of the fur trade came a brief period of gold exploration. The area remained the domain of prospectors, fur traders, trappers and hunters until well into the 20th century. Approval for the creation of Williston Lake in 1962 resulted in the development of pulp-sawmill facilities beginning in 1966 in the area which has become the town of MacKenzie.

Williston Lake has a relatively rapid flushing rate with a water residence time of approximately 2.2 years. Bathymetric characteristics reflect the lake's reservoir origin with depths progressing from river depths of 1 to 2 meters at the head of the Finlay and Parsnip Reaches to approximately 166 meters depth at the Dam (at full pool). Deeply incised former stream valleys cut through submerged benchland/terraces leading to a central channel. Submerged standing timber covers much of the lake bottom. The lake is considered dimictic and oligotrophic with excellent water quality.

Improvements Summary: 
Main Camp and 11 outpost camps
Improvements: 

Main Lodge is Fully Renovated, full kitchen, 3- 3 piece bathrooms, washer and dryer, 4 guest bedrooms, generator for power, water storage (3000 gallons) and Running Water.

  • 1 rec building,
  • 3 guest cabins,
  • 4 guide cabins,
  • Storage shed,
  • generator building

11 outpost camps: 2 with cabins, remainder spike camps

Equipment: 
  • Jet Boat,
  • Barge,
  • 4-Side by sides,
  • 1-quad,
  • 1-4 seat ranger, 
  • 4 quad trailers,
  • various tools, chain saws,
  • Wall Tents, Wall tent frames
  • 10 horses and tack
Other Information: 

Call Harry for more details at 250-717-1100

56.161337°, -122.769470°
Photos: 

Hunting Territory north of Fort St. James

#946
$179,000
Sold
Size: 

375 square miles appr.

Location: 

North of Fort St. James

Game Species: 
Moose, Mountain Goat, Grizzly, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Wolf
Fish Species: 
Dolly Varden, Bull Trout, Lake Char, Rainbow Trout, Burbot
WMU: 
7-28
Quotas: 
2017 - 2021 - 5 year quota: 10 moose, 1 grizzly, remainder open
Description: 

This 375 square mile territory is located on the headwaters of the Nation River and takes in Tsayta Lake and Indata Lake.  The territory has a history of good game populations and supports the opportunity to harvest mountain goat, grizzly, moose, mule deer, elk, black bear and wolf.  Elk have only recently moved into the area which is true through many other regions of BC.  Hunting is done, by 4x4, 4wheeler and boat.  In the past horses have also been used to access more remote areas.  Excellent renovated main camp with log cabin, attached shed, gazebo, outhouse.  Good equipment list and general camp equipment is included as well as boat and motors or canoes on certain lakes.  Everything here to step right in and take over.  There is a Licence of Occupation over the main camp and a Park Use Permit in place. This territory has a good array of species, great fishing and canoeing.  Could make an ideal start up operation for an outfitter or ideal for a small group wishing to have their own private get away.

Call Harry  to discuss @ 250-717-1100.

Area Data: 

Fort St. James:  The scenic gateway to an impressive network of lakes, rivers and mountains, the trading post of Fort St. James is located on the shores of Stuart Lake. Fort St. James was originally established by the explorer Simon Fraser for the North West Company in 1806. The fort was the social and economic heart of the fur-trade district, known as New Caledonia, and was the main contact point between fur traders and the Carrier Indians, with furs gathered here being shipped to the European market.  Fort St. James has been restored as a National Historic Site, with town buildings dating back to the 1880s.

Today, mining, forestry, and a growing tourism industry all play an active role in the economy of the local Fort St James community. Year-round outdoor and indoor recreational opportunities include camping, hiking and biking trails, ballparks, golf, fishing, waterskiing, canoeing, swimming, sailing and boating, alpine and nordic skiing, skating, hockey, curling, snowmobiling, and dog sledding.

The region is rich in wildlife, one of the last great wilderness and resource industry frontiers in the world. This spectacular part of Canada is sparsely populated yet accessible; rural and wild, yet well serviced and close to big city amenities. The weather is characterized by snowy winters and warm summers. 

Goods from eastern Canada and Europe were brought to Fort St. James for distribution through the fort to outposts in the surrounding area. The fort was the social and economic heart of the fur-trade district, known as New Caledonia, and was the main contact point between fur traders and the Carrier Indians, with furs gathered here being shipped to the European market.

Fort St. James has been restored as a National Historic Site, with town buildings dating back to the 1880s. Fort St. James displays the largest group of original wooden buildings representing the fur trade in Canada. Site visitors have the same spectacular view of Stuart Lake that the Carrier Indians and the fur traders knew so well. Not that they all saw this view the same way: while this was 'home' to the Carrier people, to the fur traders it was 'wilderness'. Hardships, adventures, challenges and changes are all part of the story of this place.

Today, mining, forestry, and a growing tourism industry all play an active role in the economy of the local Fort St James community. Year-round outdoor and indoor recreational opportunities include camping, hiking and biking trails, ballparks, golf, fishing, waterskiing, canoeing, swimming, sailing and boating, alpine and nordic skiing, skating, hockey, curling, snowmobiling, and dog sledding.

The region is rich in wildlife, one of the last great wilderness and resource industry frontiers in the world. This spectacular part of Canada is sparsely populated yet accessible; rural and wild, yet well serviced and close to big city amenities. The weather is characterized by snowy winters and warm summers.
 

Nation Lakes Provincial Park offers a 120 kilometre route to canoeists through four spectacular lakes – Tsayta, Indata, Tchentlo and Chuchi. The Nation Lakes chain connects these lakes which drain into the Arctic watershed. The Park encompasses Tsayta and Indata lakes plus several small parcels of land on Tchentlo and Chuchi lakes. Depending on how quickly you travel, canoeing the lake chain in its entirety takes between five and ten days. At various locations along the lake chain you will find both rustic Provincial Park campsites and Forest Service Recreation campsites for canoeists to rest and enjoy the amazing sunsets.

Improvements Summary: 
main camp
Improvements: 
  • Newly renovated cabin with attached shed
  • Gazebo - large, screened in with metal roof
  • outhouse
Equipment: 
  • 16' flat bottom wood boat with console and 40 HP Yamaha
  • 15' V aluminum boat with 15 HP 2 stroke Mercury
  • trolling motor
  • canoe
  • 1 early 2000 Honda Foreman 4x4 quad
  • 2 early 2000 Yamaha Kodiak 4x4 quads
  • 1 ATV trailer
  • wood stoves, camp stoves, lanterns, tents, cots, folding tables, chairs, etc.
  • generators
  • water pump
  • chain saw
  • miscellaneous tools
55.360665°, -125.361900°
Photos: 
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